FLOURISH FEST: DAY 3 PT 1 – AVOCADOS, MERMAIDS, AND HARDWOOD SOUNDPADS

When I wake Saturday morning, the power has gone out. Outside, Fredericton is blustery and grim, threatening rain, and smoke hangs over the neighbourhood of the Charlotte Street Arts Center from a nearby construction fire; as I turn onto Charlotte street, firefighters are still extinguishing the gutted, half-finished apartment building.

Thankfully, the CSAC has power, and is warm, dry, and well-lit. I make my way to Connexion Artist-Run Center’s office and gallery, where Indigo Poirier of Wangled Teb is setting up a workshop on Ableton Live. Suspended in the middle of the room is an exhibit of miniature-scale couture creations titled Weight of Power, by local fashion designer Tracy Austin: lush, dark, gowns ornamented with petals, thorns, and branches. Workshop attendees are seated in a row of chairs beneath the exhibit, making it seem like they are haunted by a brace of regal fairies floating in midair.

With their computer screen projected on the wall, Indigo begins demonstrating various Ableton functions and plugins that they use while performing. While most of the technical details go over my head, it is fascinating getting to watch Indigo reveal the workings of several of their Wangled Teb sets, including one or two pieces I have previously seen in performance. Most of the workshop participants are other Flourish performers, including the duo behind VERSA Visuals, and folk singer Kylie Fox. The workshop feels collaborative and open, and Indigo takes various questions and suggestions from the attendees, showing them how to create particular effects they request, demonstrating how to map tracks and effects onto electronic consoles, and explaining how to free up processing speed for more complicated pieces.

For the second half of the workshop, Indigo invites the participants to bring out their own computers and instruments to experiment with Ableton. Though part of me wants to stay and listen, when the group breaks for coffee, I thank Indigo, and make my way downtown.

It is stormy and raining by the time I reach Bellwether, a local vintage and art consignment shop. Inside,  Erin Muir and Corey Bonnevie of Wrote have begun playing. Muir’s soft soprano voice and muted, finger picked guitar ballads are accompanied by the sound of clothes hangers faintly clicking as people search through racks of clothing from Flourish pop-up Ok My Dear Vintage. Seated on a vintage wood-and-floral-velvet bench, with her boots neatly removed and tucked behind her, Muir sings about watching houseplants wither, and lupin-planting as grief work. Surrounded by local artwork and macrame plant hangers, Wrote’s music feels at home in the small, intimate setting of Bellwether, each song’s soft, organic tones a refuge from the rain.

The next performer is Kylie Fox, arriving from the Ableton workshop. Her set begins with a cover of Joni MItchell’s “Case of you,” executed so tenderly that I am convinced the song was written precisely for her voice. Backed by acoustic guitar, Fox’s voice is bold and ethereal, with an almost operatic vibrato at its peaks and sweet, delicate tones when she sings softly. Her down to earth humour runs through the storytelling between songs, as well as in the songs themselves. Fox’s song “Avocado” is dedicated to a friend who, while pregnant, discovered one week that her baby was the size of an avocado. “People ask if it was planned and you say– bitch –under your breath,” sings Fox, peppering what could easily have been a sentimental topic with enough sarcasm, reality, and empathy to make it unmistakably genuine.

While heading back to the CSAC, I am caught in a sudden downpour, and end up taking shelter from the rain in the newly opened library of NBCCD, Fredericton’s local craft college. This weekend, the library is hosting Flourish’s annual zine and craft fair. Local and visiting artists are set up to sell their wares: comics and postcards by Patrick Allaby and Laura K. Watson, zines by Al Cusack and Olivia Thompson, hand-sewn scrunchies by Sackville-based designer Jeska Grue, issues of Fredericton-based literary Qwerty Magazine, and more.

Even as I am delighted by the art on display, something begins to nag at me: I am the only brown person in the room. I can’t say this is unusual in the Maritimes, and I’m generally desensitized to being the only person of colour around, but for whatever reason, the presence of several white people with waist-length dreads at the zine fair makes me suddenly hyper-aware of the room’s overwhelming whiteness. It’s hardly shocking, but at the same time, it is. Saying anything about this feels like a risk. I could too easily become a villain, the stereotypical angry brown femme meant to be laughed at and dismissed. I know any anger or discomfort I feel is loneliness, the reminder of how isolated I am from communities that understand this feeling, too.

Scanning my festival program, I realize there are only two visible people of colour among the hundred or so performers featured all weekend. One of the two, Wabanaki fashion designer Mariah Sockabasin, is scheduled to showcase some of her designs at the same time as the event I was headed to before being interrupted by the rain–an open jam session for women, trans, two-spirit, and non-binary youth hosted by Girls+ Rock Camp at the CSAC.

Being torn between the two events is a visceral reminder of the way in which QTBIPOC are made to choose between our communities, forced to abandon our ethnic communities to feel included for our genders or sexualities, or forced to closet ourselves in order to belong with our racialized kin. Even on such a small scale–me, alone, with all my privilege to choose between attending one amazing art event or another–it hurts to defer part of your identity.

I arrive rain-soaked and out of breath at the Girls+ Rock Camp session. Members of various bands performing at Flourish, including Motherhood’s Penelope Stevens, songwriter Jane Blanchard, and Indigo Poirier are guiding about a dozen young people as they play on several drum kits, keyboards, synth tables, and guitars scattered around the CSAC auditorium. A constant groove emerges from the various rhythm stations, and a song begins to take shape as I watch. Two young girls wearing pastel hijabs join Indigo at the mic, and sing about everyone becoming mermaids. Other kids around the room chime in gradually, singing and laughing along, swapping instruments and making new friends.

After stopping to warm up with a coffee from Milda’s Pizza and More, I make my way back through the rain to Gallery 78, a historic, turreted house on the South bank of the Wolastoq river. Featuring several exhibits by local artists, today, the gallery’s main room hosts a pop-up installation by classical/songwriting duo Pallmer and Montreal-based electronic artist Charles Harding.

On the floor, Harding has taped off a large square with arrows pointing through it, accompanied by the words “Step Study.” Pallmer cellist Emily Kennedy and violist Mark Kleyn are set up at opposite corners of the square, and play from scored composed by Harding: though the scores contain standard lines of musical notation, between each line, there are sections denoted by colourful, abstract blobs and waves. The performance begins with Pallmer playing an airy, minimalistic duet, but the twist is revealed when Harding walks through the outlined square, and invites the audience to do the same. As soon as anyone walks into the square in the center of the room, Pallmer’s playing becomes a musical interpretation mimicking the person’s steps.

Tiptoeing through the square incurs soft, plucked harmonics. Stomping results in loud, heavy chords. When three women dance into the square together, holding hands and spinning, the music becomes a raucous waltz that follows their every movement. Pallmer’s improvisations echo the speed, weight, and feel of the audience’s interventions as people become bolder and begin to experiment: one man removes his shoes and slides across the floor; a Flourish volunteer gets down on the floor and log-rolls through the square; some people try squeaking their rain-wet shoes against the hardwood to test the effect; and at one point, people try throwing coats and keys into the ring, incurring a variety of sustained harmonics and chords.

Throughout the performance, the art gallery becomes a dance floor and soundpad, where the audience is invited to collaborate in the music, using their bodies as instruments. Step Study is an invitation to play along with the performers, not just in the musical sense, but in the childlike, imaginative realm. As the piece comes to a close, the final audience intervention that modifies the score is when Erin Goodine (of Fredericton band Terre Wa) pulls up a corner of the tape delineating the square soundpad, breaking the barrier between the scored and improvised music for a moment before gently putting it back. After enthusiastic applause, Harding explains that his goal is to make performance interactive. The performances of his piece at Flourish are also data-gathering expeditions, as Harding intends to compose a future piece based on the step and sound patterns recorded during the festival. As everyone leaves Gallery 78, we leave as co-conspirators and collaborators in this future composition.


Contribution by Rebecca Salazar (she/her)

Rebecca Salazar is the author of the knife you need to justify the wound (Rahila’s Ghost) and Guzzle (Anstruther Press). Recent publications include poetry and non-fiction in Briarpatch, Minola Review, and The Puritan. Rebecca is currently a poetry editor for The Fiddlehead and Plenitude magazines, and a PhD candidate at UNB.

FLOURISH FEST: DAY 1 – WHEELIE SHOES + CARTOON SWORDS

The floods that days ago engulfed most of downtown Fredericton have just receded. It is unusually cold and gloomy for late April, but downtown’s Shiftwork Studio is warmly lit and in full colour. I arrive just as the first two bands playing Flourish Fest’s opening set are sound checking, and chat briefly with festival founder Jane Blanchard, who hands me my festival pass, a hand-printed geometric piece made by Jane and her co-founder and collaborator Stefan Westner in the very studio this first show takes place in.

I have lived in Fredericton for nearly six years, just a year longer than Flourish has been running. Having arrived as a grad student with no intention to stay in the Maritimes after my first, two-year program, I spent the first-ever Flourish at home or at the library, buried in books. It was not until I became more involved and invested in Fredericton’s small but impressive queer and arts communities that I became aware of Flourish, and I have made a point to come to a few shows and its annual zine & craft fairs ever since. The festival and the artists it features each year make Fredericton feel shimmering and vital each spring.

Waiting in a corner of Shiftwork studio for the show to begin, I watch members of Frooti-Toot-E zip through the room on wheelie shoes post-soundcheck, and am excited for what this year will bring.

“Who wants to get cozy and come closer to us?” asks the singer of indie rock outfit Terminal, the first band to play. “Or maybe have a dance off?” Dressed in monochromatic baby pink, Cameron Corey leads their band through bouncy riffs, with vocals ranging from  Bowie-esque pop tones to cartoon-villain-worthy cackles.

Introduced by the festival program as “fashion icons from the future,” Frooti Toot-E takes the studio stage next. Recently profiled by nybc, the experimental trio is dressed according to the colours of their band personas: Banana, in a yellow polo dress and rubber duck-print bucket hat, Peach, in pink faux fur and fuzzy antennae, and Tomato, in an oversized red t-shirt that reads “#1 Dad.”

Frooti Toot-E’s first song chronicles Tomato’s existential woes (“I’m a fruit, not a veggie,” she sings). After an initial ballad section, the song shifts into a poppy rap sequence as each member of the band introduces herself in character. The back-beats swell in tempo and build up to a high-energy battle, each band member performing riotous choreography with cartoon plastic swords.

The audience cheers and laughs as Frooti-TootE charm us through their songs with unabashed, artful silliness. Though their song lyrics are largely a series of jokes and puns–excellent puns!– on fruit names, the band cover topics ranging from lost love to self-affirmation with a sense of humour that feels both genuine and infectious.

While I am sad to have to leave the opening show early for another, non-Flourish event, I leave joyful and laughing, still buzzed with the energy of the studio.


Contribution by Rebecca Salazar (she/her)

Rebecca Salazar is the author of the knife you need to justify the wound (Rahila’s Ghost) and Guzzle (Anstruther Press). Recent publications include poetry and non-fiction in Briarpatch, Minola Review, and The Puritan. Rebecca is currently a poetry editor for The Fiddlehead and Plenitude magazines, and a PhD candidate at UNB.

FLOURISH FEST: INTERVIEW #2 – TERRE WA

As part of the media coverage for FLOURISH (April 25-28), not your boys club will be having conversations with some of the folks that will be organizing, creating, and performing at the festival.

For the second interview of the series, I spoke with Indigo (she/they), Erin (she/her), and Emily (she/her) from Fredericton’s own, Terre Wa.

Indigo Rain Poirier (synth/drum machine) is an electronic musician recently awarded “artist of the year” for their solo project, Wangled Teb. Erin Goodine (synth) is an interdisciplinary artist, collaborator, and designer new to improvised electronic music. Emily Kennedy (cello) is a cellist, improviser, and collaborator active in genre-crossing projects with poets, textile artists, and dancers.

Together, Terre Wa is a powerful synthesis of these diverse backgrounds in visual arts and classical, experimental, and electronic music. Their improvised sets can abruptly turn from heart-wrenchingly beautiful to dark, intense, and menancing.

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Photo by Emily Kennedy

How did Terre Wa form and how long have you been creating and playing music together?

Indigo: Terre Wa originally kind of grew out of a project Erin, her sister Robin, and myself were organizing called Sunday Music Spa. Sunday Music Spa is an ambient jam session for women and non-binary people where we set up a bunch of synths/drum machines, encourage people to bring their own instruments if they want or to use ours, and relax and make noise together in a soothing, supportive environment. Sometimes we make tea. It’s great. We had been hosting these sessions periodically for about a year or so, I think? Anyway, after awhile of performing together in that space, Erin and I ended up playing a set at Reads (god rest its soul) along with New Hermitage and Northern Apparatus, and then we decided we wanted to keep performing together and asked Emily to join us not long after.

Erin: Yeah, I think we had been doing Sunday Music Spa for around a year by that time. Sunday Music Spa came out of the need for a space that welcomed experimentation from people who were not musicians. I’ve always been interested in synthesizers and experimental music, but it always felt so daunting to learn how to play that type of music myself. After having that space to learn more about synthesizers and the time to experiment, Indigo was so generous to invite me to play a set at Reads with them even though I didn’t have much experience. It was the first time I had ever played music in front of an audience, but it was really encouraging and we got really good feedback from that first show. Once Emily joined us we became Terre Wa and everything came together so well.

Emily: Yeah, I went to that first show at Reads, and it was awesome! I was so stoked on it, I was was pretty tickled when they asked me if I wanted to jam, and then that was that. I’ve always enjoyed electronic music, and Terre Wa has been an awesome project to just explore how a good old wooden cello can fit in and mix with that kind of soundscape.

What can people typically expect from a Terre Wa set? Specifically at Flourish?

Erin: I guess it’s hard to say what to expect because it’s so different every time! Since all of our performances are improvised, we don’t necessarily know what it’s going to sound like going into a set. We did start to notice that the spaces we’ve performed in have really influenced the sound, like bar venues tend to be louder and more intense, while outdoor areas and quieter venues build up slower and are more relaxed. We will be creating an outdoor sound installation at Flourish this year as well as performing, so that will definitely influence the sound.

It seems that, outside of playing music together as Terre Wa, you are all very active in the music and arts community. I was hoping you could all offer some insight and perspective on the community there for folks not living, working, and creating in Fredericton.

Emily: Fredericton is a pretty special little arts community. I’m from New Brunswick, but I had lived in Ontario for seven years or so before deciding to move back home. It was really eye opening coming back – there are just so many supportive and hard working artists and musicians here. I think when I left, I felt the classic “grass is always greener” need to get away from where I was from, to go someplace larger. It feels even more special now to see how much of a gem this place is. There is this very grass roots, do-it-yourself culture here. People aren’t afraid to just start something, whether it’s a musical project or a festival. When you see that all around you, it’s inspiring. You realize that you can do that as well.

What does Flourish Festival mean for each of you? 

Erin: Flourish always feels like such a nice celebration. Friends come back to town, the weather gets warmer. I’ve seen some of my favorite shows at Flourish, not only because of the amazing musicians and artists, but also for the space it creates.

Emily: Yes! Flourish is the best way to send off winter – a weekend jam packed with great music, art and pals.

Erin, can you specifically talk about your involvement with the arts and the collaborative textile poster that you worked on for Flourish?

Erin: Yes! I primarily work as a graphic designer by day, and had the opportunity to collaborate with my sister Robin Goodine and Emily Blair on the Flourish Fest poster. They created a textile piece in Montreal and I designed a poster around it. I’m also an interdisciplinary  artist and have contributed artwork and installations for Flourish Fest in the past and have been involved in many collaborative art projects in Fredericton with the Shiftwork Collective and Connexion ARC. I’ve had some really great opportunities to collaborate with many amazing artists and musicians over the years. I also recently collaborated with Emma Hassencahl-Perley and Emilie Grace Lavoie on a curatorial project at the Beaverbrook Art Gallery that will be open during Flourish Festival this year.

Indigo, I know that you also play solo under the name Wangled Teb. Through this project, I saw that you will be offering a free workshop at The Charlotte Street Arts Centre Auditorium that will empower folks to use Ableton Live. Can you share what folks can expect of this workshop?

Yes! I’m going to talk about some basic terms that people should be familiar with when mixing, some general techniques for EQ and compression, a brief explanation of subtractive/analog synthesizers, and how I use Ableton for live performance. I might also go a bit deeper into how I approach writing a piece if there’s time.

What are each of you most excited for during this years Flourish Festival outside of your involvement(s)?

Indigo: Definitely excited to see Property again. I saw them play at Reads (god rest its soul) last year and they were AWESOME. Also that whole lineup for the Shiftwork show on Friday looks great!!

Erin: I’m excited to see Indigo and Emily’s other projects Wangled Teb and Pallmer! I’m also looking forward to seeing Carinae again. I saw them for the first time at last years Quality Block Party in Saint John, and they were amazing!

Emily: Yes, all of the above! And I can’t wait to see Thanya Iyer (and everything on Friday..), and the Flourish Gallery Crawl – – should be a lot of fun!

Terre Wa plays Flourish Festival on Saturday, April 27th at The Charlotte Street Arts Centre Auditorium (all ages / doors at 530 / $15)


Contribution by Nikki A Basset

FLOURISH FEST: INTERVIEW #1 – JANE BLANCHARD

As part of the media coverage for FLOURISH (April 25-28), not your boys club will be having conversations with some of the folks that will be organizing, creating, and performing at the festival.

For the first interview in the series, I’m speaking with Jane Blanchard (she/her), the co-founder and co-director of FLOURISH. Currently splitting her time between Edinburgh and Fredericton, she also plays music under her own name and keyboards in David in the Dark.

jane blanchard

Photo by L. P. Chaisson

Before speaking to all the things that the fifth year of FLOURISH festival has to offer, could you bring me back to when FLOURISH was founded? I would really like to hear about the dreaming that went into the origins of FLOURISH.

FLOURISH Festival started as a term project when I was in my second year at Renaissance College at The University of New Brunswick. The course was in Project Management, and after attending a community arts gathering, I decided that throwing a mini-festival that incorporated visual art, music and other disciplines would be fun. My best friend and bandmate Stefan Westner ran (and still runs) an art collective called Shiftwork that were famous (and still are) for doing these sweet DIY 24 hour pop-up shows, so together we started brainstorming on how to run a festival.

FLOURISH Festival was inspired by many events, people and groups that were encouraging the scene at the time (and in most cases, still are in some capacity). The Shifty Bits Circus was run by The Shifty Bits Cult (Motherhood, Penelope Stevens) and were throwing an out of this world DIY festival every summer that really showed us that something like this was possible – and who also connected us to so many amazing people. Tate LeJeune founded a great event called ‘Blossom, Don’t Burst’ (maybe a more obvious name influence there, haha) at Connexion ARC – which was a one day event open to all artists under 20 years old to showcase their work.

I like to think that FLOURISH grew from a mix of these influences plus our own experiences of playing in bands, throwing art shows, and hanging at The Capital Complex five nights a week. We thought FLOURISH was just going to be a one-off event, but we quickly became obsessed and it has been a passion project ever since. It’s thrilling to see how it has grown and morphed along with the community. In the first year, it was thrown together in less than 2 months with everyone volunteering their time, playing for free, and trusting two people who really didn’t know what they were doing. We are thrilled that the bigger we get, the more we can feed back into the arts community and continue connecting artists across the country.

What gaps do you feel FLOURISH filled in the arts & music community in Fredericton? Atlantic Canada?

I think that every year we learn and recognize different gaps in the community and by looking at our festival retrospectively, we work towards bridging them. When FLOURISH started, we wanted to contribute to a larger all ages scene, show a better use of alternative venue spaces, and promote more cross-collaboration between local artists. These are all still very important factors, but now in our fifth year we have a broadened focus.

With Shifty Bits Circus no longer running, FLOURISH Festival is really the only festival in the city that is artist run with a focus on emerging acts. Shivering Songs is a fantastic artist-run community festival like us and so such a superb job of showcasing phenomenal talent. We like to think of FLOURISH Festival as the event that showcases the bands and artists that maybe you have never heard of before but maybe you’ll see playing these larger festivals in a year or two.

Our big focus this year has been community involvement – reaching out to new volunteers, engaging new businesses, and being more vocal with our ideas to government and community partners (who are all super supportive) to give artists a platform to showcase their wild and wonderful ideas in a supportive environment. I like to think that we also help local artists grow their networks by bringing in acts from away and fostering communication and community. We’re just trying our best to make something valuable to artists and attendees alike – a unique experience in an inclusive and fun environment. We know we haven’t even come close to filling all the gaps in the arts & music community in Fredericton and beyond, but we are trying to set an example and work together with other like minded festivals and groups in the Maritimes to always do better.

As one of two co-founders, how do you feel the festival has grown since its first iteration?

The festival has grown at a steady pace – which has been super. Every year we are growing and able to offer more programming, but we are not becoming too big to manage. Everything we know about planning a festival has been 100% self taught and navigated thanks to our community, so we grow as curators and facilitators every year.

I think in many ways, FLOURISH Festival is a direct reflection on the personal growth of both myself and Stefan as we learn more, become more engaged, and feel more confident with our abilities. For example, we have definitely grown in regards to inclusivity. Like, I just had a look at our lineup for our second edition, which was a great time, but only 4 bands out of 41 were femme fronted where now it’s more like 32 out of 46. As a femme curator and artist, I am now so much more aware of the responsibility I hold in regards to programming. That’s a direct reflection of my experience touring and seeing the gender-gap at festivals and events. Every year we release our lineup and although we are proud of it – there are always ways that we can do better. Festivals like DIY Spring, MEGAPHONO, Lawnya Vawnya and Kazoo! Fest are a few that we look up to in regards to great programming and mandates.

What can folks attending the festival expect this year that will be different than previous years?

We are really excited about our all ages shows this year! We always have great all ages shows, but this year we will be using the Charlotte Street Arts Centre as a more central venue in our programming. We have a few high school bands who will be performing which has been a community that we have been trying to involve more. We are hoping this will start building a stronger relationship with the all ages music and art scene in the city, and will hopefully encourage young bands and artists to want to showcase their work in coming years!

We are doing a music crawl, which is a new thing for us – inspired by the music crawl at Lawnya Vawnya that I was lucky to be a part of for their 2018 edition! This is going to allow us to showcase some sweet areas in the city that a lot of people (especially people from outside of the city) may not know as well – like the New Brunswick College of Craft and Design LibraryNew Brunswick College of Craft and Design Library.

We are still the FLOURISH Festival people know and love – but this year you can expect some more magic, some more community involvement, and as always, fantastic events.

Can you speak to the intention of the festival, and what kind of culture you dream of cultivating through it?

The intention is to continue showcasing Fredericton as a cultural centre – as a hub for amazing visual artists, bands, electronic projects, theatre groups and more. There is such an amazing support system in this community – from The Capital Complex, people like Zach Atkinson, Matt Carter at Grid City, Laurel at Bellwether, all of The Charlotte Street Arts Centre… there really are too many to name! Events like FLOURISH Festival remind us all that we are a strong, dedicated, and creative community. We want FLOURISH Festival to be a place that can act as a jump starter to form new connections and new ideas. We want people to be inspired to start new bands, make new art, and create new projects.

Can you share any ideas for growth and development you have for future iterations of FLOURISH fest?

We are really keen to continue developing our artist in residence program. It’s a really special program that has cultivated so many life-long friends and has secured Fredericton as a second home to many. We want to work on increased diversity for next year and will be focusing on bringing a wider range of acts from all backgrounds to the festival. We would like to work together with new community groups such as the Fredericton Multicultural Association and The Mi’kmaq-Wolastoque Centre, and to have a heavier involvement in the all-ages community and the francophone community. In coming years we also envision taking over more public spaces and including some site specific installations as well as more free programming and access to things such as childcare and kid-friendly events for festival goers and artists. We have so much that we want to do, and we always make a huge list following the festival on notes and goals to work on, so we are really excited for 2019, and also to get to work on 2020!


Contribution by Nikki A Basset

FESTIVAL LINEUP: FLOURISH

Announced this morning, Flourish Fest released their full 2019 festival line-up happening the weekend of April 25th to 28th.

Held in Fredericton, NB, Flourish is a music & arts festival with inclusive programming that promotes and embraces community-building, the DIY and emerging, and works that challenge and engage. With intentionally diverse programming, there is something for everyone to appreciate and enjoy.

From the glittery indie-pop of And the Kids, Property, and Thanya Iyer, the punchy punk of Esme & the Dishrags, Coy, and Lemongrab, the vulnerable soft-rock of Weary, l i l a, and Mary-Kate Edwards, the electronic soundscapes of Terre Wa, VERSA, and Kee Avil, and everything else in between – there really isn’t any musical genre left ignored.

not your boys club is excited to be partnering with Flourish and providing pre-festival coverage and promotion by interviewing some of the organizers, artists, and musicians that will be contributing to the overall experience of the weekend.

Purchase a festival pass and apply to volunteer at http://www.flourish-fest.com.

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Contribution by: Nikki A Basset